The Model Millionaire Workbook Solution : ICSE Treasure Chest

The Model Millionaire Workbook Solution : ICSE Treasure Chest

Welcome to “The Model Millionaire Workbook Solution: ICSE Treasure Chest,” where we embark on a journey through the captivating narrative of ICSE English Literature Treasure Chest. Within these pages, we meticulously unravel the essence of “The Model Millionaire” through comprehensive workbook solutions. This post offers comprehensive answers to multiple-choice and contextual questions, deepening your understanding of this timeless tale. Meet the characters and delve into the nuances of character development and thematic exploration. Each question serves as a gateway to dissecting the text, urging readers to analyze subtle nuances and extract deeper meanings. Contextual inquiries broaden our canvas for exploration, encouraging critical engagement with socio-cultural backdrops and universal themes. Through this examination, readers sharpen analytical skills and develop a profound appreciation for literary craftsmanship. Whether a student navigating ICSE English Literature or an avid reader unraveling beloved stories, “The Model Millionaire Workbook Solutions” promises valuable companionship. Join us on this literary journey as we illuminate the path to understanding, one workbook solution at a time.

 

Table of Contents

Story Summary :

Hughie Erskine was a handsome young man. He was popular with his male as well as female friends. But he was poor. All he had was one cavalry sword and a History of Peninsular War’ in fifteen volumes, that he inherited from his father from his father, besides two hundred pounds a year from an aunt. He had tried many occupations but had failed to achieve success in any profession. As a result he was jobless “with a perfect profile and no profession.” 

Hughie was in love with the lovely Laura, whose father was a retired Colonel who had served in India. He demanded Hughie to have at least 10,000 pounds before getting engaged to Laura.

Hughie had an art lover friend, Alan Trevor. One day on his way to meet Laura he went to his friend, Alan Trevor’s studio. He found him giving finishing touches to the portrait of a beggar. He was working on the picture of a wrinkled old man wearing tattered rags, holding out in his hand a battered hat for alms. Hughie pitied the model who was getting only a few shillings compared to two thousand guineas that the artist was getting for his painting. 

Meanwhile, a servant informed that the frame maker wanted to speak to Trevor. When Trevor went out, the (model) beggar relaxed. Hughie pitied the beggar, and gave him the only sovereign he had in his pocket and left to meet Laura. Laura scolded him for his generosity while Trevor had a hearty laugh when Hughie met him later that day. Trevor explained to Hughie that the old man whom he thought to be a wretched beggar was one of the richest men in Europe. Trevor informed him that the old beggar, was Baron Hausberg who had commissioned Trevor to paint him as a beggar. Trevor also said that he had told him everything about Hughie and Laura as the Baron was impressed with him and had enquired of him. Soon after, Hughie feeling ashamed and angry went home. 

Next morning, a messenger came to Hughie’s house saying that he had come from Baron Hausberg. He had brought a cheque of 10,000 pounds as a wedding gift to Hughie and Laura. Soon their marriage was solemnised in which Trevor became the best-man and the Baron made a speech at the wedding breakfast. Alan remarked, ‘Millionaire models are rare enough but model millionaire are rarer still!’

Workbook MCQs :

1. What made Alan Trevor give Hughie a permanent entrée to his studio?
(a) His indifference towards the family.
(b) His pauperism.
(c) Hughie’s spirits and kindness.
(d) His bright ideas.

Answer: (c) Hughie’s spirits and kindness.

2. What was the special feature of the model beggar?
(a) His patched and cobbled boots.
(b) His battered hat.
(c) His torn and tattered cloak.
(d) His piteous expression.

Answer: (d) His piteous expression.

3. What did Hughie do during Trevor’s absence?
(a) He admired Trevor’s paintings.
(b) He smoked a cigarette.
(c) He gave a sovereign to the beggar.
(d) He admired the looks of the model.

Answer: (c) He gave a sovereign to the beggar.

4. “What a duffer he must think me!” said Hughie. Why?

(a) He could not differentiate between a rich man and himself.
(b) He could not understand Trevor’s paintings.
(c) He gave money to a model thinking him as a beggar.
(d) None of the above.

Answer: (c) He gave money to a model thinking him as a beggar.

5. Why did Hughie think that he should apologise to the Baron?
(a) He felt that he had insulted him.
(b) He felt that he had hurt him.
(c) He felt that he had made a mistake by giving him a sovereign.
(d) He was afraid on knowing that he was Baron.

Answer: (c) He felt that he had made a mistake by giving him a sovereign.

6. “It reflects the highest credit on your philanthropic spirit” is an appreciation from whom and for
whom?
(a) Laura Merton for Hughie
(b) Alan Trevor for Hughie
(c) Baron Hausberg for Hughie
(d) Colonel for Laura Merton

Answer: (c) Baron Hausberg for Hughie

7. What does “Millionaire models are rare enough” indicate?
(a) Modelling does not pay well so millionaire models are rare.
(b) Models are always available but are poor.
(c) Models who are millionaires are hardly found.
(d) Models are costly so a model is a millionaire.

Answer: (c) Models who are millionaires are hardly found.

8. Which figure of speech is used in the line: “that old beggar, as you can see him, is one of the richest men in Europe’?
(a) Irony
(b) Metaphor
(c) Personification
(d) Simile

Answer: (a) Irony

9. “But what was a butterfly among bulls and bears” means
(a) Hughie liked butterflies
(b) Hughie did not fit in at the Stock Exchange
(c) There were butterflies around bulls and bears
(d) None of the above

Answer: (b) Hughie did not fit in at the Stock Exchange

10. Which literary device is used in the line: “Laura adored him and he was ready to kiss her shoe strings”?
(a) Imagery
(b) Metaphor
(c) Hyperbole
(d) Irony

Answer: For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

11. The theme of the story is
(a) Generosity
(b) Morality
(c) Wealth
(d) All of the above.

Answer: For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

12. Whose point of view is the narrator showing when he says, ‘He looked so forlorn’?
(a) Hughie’s
(b) Trevor’s
(c) The audience’s
(d) None of the above

Answer: For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

13. Who is he” and whose rags were they in the line-“he made a magnificent figure in his rags”?
(a) Trevor, Hughie’s
(b) Baron, Trevor’s
(c) Hughie, Baron’s
(d) Baron, Baron’s

Answer: For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

14. According to Trevor where is an artist’s heart?
(a) In his chest
(b) In his stomach
(c) In his work
(d) In his mind

Answer: For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

Workbook Questions :

Extract 1

Unless one is wealthy there is no use in being a charming fellow. Romance is the privilege of the rich, not the profession of the unemployed. The poor should be practical and prosaic. It is better to have a permanent income than to be fascinating. These are the great truths of modern life which Hughie Erskine never realised. Poor Hughie! Intellectually, we must admit, he was not of much importance. He never said a brilliant or even an ill-natured thing in his life. But then he was wonderfully good-looking, with his crisp brown hair, his clear-cut profile, and his grey eyes.

(i) What is said about wealth in the extract? Give the meaning of “The poor should be prosaic”.

Answer : In the extract, it is stated that wealth is necessary in order to fully enjoy romance and charm. Those who are wealthy have the luxury of indulging in romantic relationships, while the poor should focus on practical and mundane matters.

“The poor should be prosaic” means that individuals who are financially disadvantaged should prioritize practicality and realism over idealistic or romantic notions. They are encouraged to be down-to-earth, sensible, and focused on practical matters that can help improve their financial situation.

(iI) Give two positive qualities of Hughie. What was his drawback?

Answer : Hughie is described as “wonderfully good-looking” with crisp brown hair, a clear-cut profile, and grey eyes. Additionally, it is stated that he never said anything brilliant or ill-natured in his life, highlighting his kind and amiable character.

But He lacked intellectual depth or significant accomplishments in terms of intelligence or knowledge. Despite his physical appeal and pleasant personality, he was not considered intellectually remarkable.

(iII) What did his father bequeath him? What did he do with his inheritance?

Answer : His father had bequeathed him his cavalry sword, and a History of the Peninsular War in fifteen volumes. Hughie hung the first over his looking-glass, put the second on a shelf between Ruff’s Guide and Bailey’s Magazine, and lived on two hundred a year that an old aunt allowed him.

(iV) How did Hughie make a living? What was his experience in the Stock Exchange and in other concerns?

Answer : Hughie Erskine did not have a steady income and relied on a meager allowance of two hundred pounds per year from his aunt. He tried working on the Stock Exchange for six months but felt out of place. He also attempted to be a tea-merchant and sell dry sherry, but both ventures were unsuccessful.

Ultimately, he became a charming yet profession-less young man.

(v) Give the meaning of the following: “Ultimately he became nothing, a delightful ineffectual young man with a perfect profile and no profession.”

Answer : The sentence suggests that despite Hughie Erskine’s attractive physical appearance and pleasing personality, he lacked a meaningful occupation or purpose in life. The phrase “ultimately he became nothing” suggests his lack of significant achievements or impact. However, he was still regarded as delightful due to his pleasing qualities, despite his ineffectualness.

Extract 2

To make matters worse, he was in love. The girl he loved was Laura Merton, the daughter of a retired Colonel who had lost his temper and his digestion in India, and had never found either of them again. Laura adored him, and he was ready to kiss her shoe-strings.

(i) Who is he’ referred to in the extract? What troubles he had earlier in his life?

Answer: ‘He’ refers to Hughie Erskine. Earlier in his life, Hughie faced troubles primarily related to his financial situation and lack of a profession. Despite his appealing qualities, such as his good looks and pleasant personality, he struggled to make money and establish a successful career. He had tried various occupations, but these ventures did not bring him success or stability.

(iI) Give the meaning of “who had lost his temper and digestion in India.” With reference to India, what theme is referred to?

Answer: The phrase “who had lost his temper and digestion in India” figuratively indicates the retired Colonel’s negative experiences and hardships during his time in India. It suggests that his emotional well-being and physical health were affected. The mention of India does not represent a specific theme but serves to emphasize the challenges the Colonel faced, which may influence his attitude towards
Hughie’s relationship with his daughter.

(iII) Name and explain the figure of speech used in the following “and he was ready to kiss her shoe- strings.”

Answer: The figure of speech used in the phrase is hyperbole. Hyperbole is a figure of speech in which exaggeration is used for emphasis or dramatic effect. In this context, it exaggerates Hughie’s deep affection and willingness to do anything for Laura. By stating that he is willing to kiss her shoe-strings, it emphasizes his intense devotion and readiness to express his love in an exaggerated and extravagant
manner.

(iV) They were the handsomest couple in London’ but what was lacking in their lives? How did they obtain it?

Answer: While Hughie and Laura were described as the “handsomest couple in London,” what was lacking in their lives was financial stability or wealth. They didn’t have any money. To obtain it, Hughie needed to accumulate ten thousand pounds, as demanded by Laura’s father. Once he achieved this, they could address the financial gap in their lives and potentially pursue their relationship.

(v) What was the Colonel’s attitude towards Hughie? What does that say about Hughie? Which characteristic trait of the Colonel is reflected in his attitude towards Hughie?

Answer: The Colonel’s attitude towards Hughie can be described as hesitant and cautious. Although the Colonel was fond of Hughie, he did not approve of his daughter Laura being engaged to him due to Hughie’s lack of personal wealth. This suggests that the Colonel values financial stability and security, prioritizing it over other qualities or characteristics that Hughie possesses. The characteristic trait reflected in the Colonel’s attitude is his emphasis on financial status or material wealth as a determining factor in his daughter’s relationship choices.

Extract 3

One morning, as he was on his way to Holland Park, where the Mertons lived, he dropped in to see a great friend of his, Alan Trevor. Trevor was a painter. But he was also an artist, and artists are rather rare Personally he was a strange rough fellow, with a freckled face and a red ragged beard. However, when he took up the brush he was a real master, and his pictures were eagerly sought after.

(i) Who is ‘he’ referred to in the extract? Where did he go? Why?

Answer : In the given extract, ‘he’ refers to Hughie. He went to visit his great friend Alan Trevor, who was a painter and an artist. Hughie visited Alan Trevor because they were friends, and Trevor’s studio was likely a place where they could spend time together and engage in artistic discussions.

(iI) Describe Alan Trevor’s appearance.

Answer : Alan Trevor had a strange and rough appearance. He had a freckled face and a red, ragged beard. This unconventional look added to his artistic persona. Despite his unconventional appearance, when Trevor picked up the brush, he displayed true mastery in his craft, and his paintings were highly sought after.

(iII) What is said about Trevor as an artist? Why was he attracted by Hughie?

Answer : As an artist, Alan Trevor was highly regarded and considered a real master of his craft. He had a unique perspective on art, believing that artists should associate with people who were both aesthetically pleasing and intellectually stimulating. It was Hughie’s personal charm that initially attracted Trevor to him. However, as Trevor got to know Hughie better, he appreciated not only his charm but also his bright buoyant spirit and generous nature.

(iV) According to Trevor whom should an artist know?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(v) Why did Trevor give permanent entry to Hughie to his studio? What does that show about Trevor?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

Extract 4

When Hughie came in he found Trevor putting the finishing touches to a wonderful life-size picture of a beggar-man. The beggar himself was standing on a raised platform in a corner of the studio. He was a wizened old man, with a face like wrinkled parchment, and a most piteous expression.

(i) Who was the beggar-man? Describe his appearance at the studio.

Answer : The beggar-man in Trevor’s studio was a wizened old man with a face like wrinkled parchment, exuding a most piteous expression. It is not explicitly mentioned who the beggar-man is, but later in the story, it is revealed that the beggar-man is actually Baron Hausberg, a wealthy man who commissioned Trevor to paint him as a beggar.

(iI) What was a model paid for a sitting? How much does an artist get for a picture?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iII) According to Hughie what must be paid to a model? How is that a comment on Victorian society at that time?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iV) What does Trevor say to imply that artist’s work is hard?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(v) What is profitable-manual work or intellectual work? Why?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

Extract 5

Don’t run away, Hughie,” he said, as he went out, I will be back in a moment. The old beggar-man took advantage of Trevor’s absence to rest for a moment on a wooden bench that was behind him. He looked so forlorn and wretched that Hughie could not help pitying him.

(i) Why did Hughie pity the beggar-man? What did he do to help him? 

Answer : Hughie pitied the beggar-man because of his forlorn and wretched appearance. To help him, Hughie took out his purse and gave him some money. The act of giving money to the beggar was Hughie’s way of showing compassion and extending assistance to someone in need. 

(iI) Which theme prevalent in the Victorian Period is shown in the action of Hughie? 

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iII) What was the reaction of the beggar-man while receiving alms from Hughie?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iV) State the impact of Hughie’s charity.

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(v) What was the reaction of Laura and Trevor on Hughie’s charity?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

Extract 6

‘Finished and framed, my boy!” answered Trevor; ‘and, by the bye, you have made a conquest. That old model you saw is quite devoted to you. I had to tell him all about you – who you are, where you live, what your income is, what prospects you have –

(i) What conquest did Hughie make?

Answer : Hughie made a conquest of the old beggar-man, who turned out to be Baron Hausberg, a wealthy individual. Trevor informed Hughie that he had to share personal details about him with the beggar. This suggests that the beggar, now known as Baron Hausberg, has taken a keen interest in Hughie and has become devoted to him.

(iI) How was the conquest made?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iII) What was the immediate fear of Hughie when he would go home?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iV) Give the meaning of :

(a) “What you call rags, | call romance. What seems poverty to you is picturesqueness to me”

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(b) “An artist’s heart is in his head”

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(v) What was told to the beggar-man about Hughie? What was Hughie’s reaction on knowing that Trevor had told the beggar about Hughie and Laura?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

Extract 7

The Baron,’ said the old gentleman with a smile, has commissioned me to bring you this letter’; and he extended a sealed envelope. On the outside was written, ‘A wedding present to Hugh Erskine and Laura Merton, from an old beggar,’ and inside was a cheque for £10,000. When they were married Alan Trevor was the best man, and the Baron made a speech at the wedding breakfast. ‘Millionaire models, remarked Alan, ‘are rare enough; but, by Jove, model millionaires are rarer still!”

(i) Who was the old gentleman who brought the letter? What were the contents in the sealed envelope?

Answer : The old gentleman who brought the letter was Monsieur Gustave Naudin, acting on behalf of Baron Hausberg. The sealed envelope contained a wedding present for Hugh Erskine and Laura Merton. On the outside of the envelope, it was written, ‘A wedding present to Hugh Erskine and Laura Merton, from an old beggar.’ Inside the envelope was a cheque for £10,000.

(iI) How did the Baron know that Hughie was in need of money? What did he do to fulfil his need?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iII) What role did Trevor play in finalising Hughie’s marriage to Laura?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iV) The story shows that the poor are generous in helping others. How did Hughie’s charity to the beggar give him rich dividends?

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(v) Explain the meaning of : “Millionaire models are rare enough, but model millionaires are rare still!

Answer : For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )