The Glove & The Lions Workbook Solution : ICSE Treasure Chest

The Glove & The Lions Workbook Solution : ICSE Treasure Chest

Welcome to “The Glove & The Lions Workbook Solution: ICSE Treasure Chest,” where we embark on a journey through the captivating narrative of ICSE English Literature Treasure Chest Part 2. Within these pages, we meticulously unravel the essence of “The Glove & The Lions” through comprehensive workbook solutions. This post offers comprehensive answers to multiple-choice and contextual questions, deepening your understanding of the timeless tale. Meet the characters and delve into the nuances of character development and thematic exploration. Each question serves as a gateway to dissecting the text, urging readers to analyze subtle nuances and extract deeper meanings. Contextual inquiries broaden our canvas for exploration, encouraging critical engagement with socio-cultural backdrops and universal themes. Through this examination, readers sharpen analytical skills and develop a profound appreciation for literary craftsmanship. Whether a student navigating ICSE English Literature or an avid reader unraveling beloved stories, “The Glove & The Lions Workbook Solutions” promises valuable companionship. Join us on this literary journey as we illuminate the path to understanding, one workbook solution at a time.

 

Table of Contents

Poem Summary :

The Poem in Detail

Stanza 1

The poem begins with the speaker describing the royal sport, i.e., a fight between two lions in an arena, being watched by King Francis and his courtiers. King Francis is described as a ‘hearty’ King: a good-hearted king, a kind and just ruler.

Aristocrats, lords, and ‘the ladies in their pride’ are all around him. The ‘ladies in their pride’ can be compared to the ‘pride of lions’. From this comparison, it can be suggested that ‘the pride of ladies’ may be as vicious as the pride of lions fighting. One couple, in particular, who captures the King’s special attention is the Count de Lorge and his lady-love. Count de Lorge’s beloved shows her savagery by dropping her glove in the sandpit where the lions were fighting and asking her beloved to jump into it to recover her glove.

The King, is looking down at the ‘royal creatures’ below him as he sits on the top of the stadium-like setup, which is packed with valour and love.’ The ‘beasts’ to which the speaker refers are suggestive of both the lions and the nobles who fight amongst themselves to seek the King’s favour.

Stanza 2

Here, the atmosphere of the fight between the lions is described. The lions are engaged in a vicious battle with one another. Their ‘blows’ are powerful like ‘beams,’ and the wind appears to be moving in step with them.

They are making a huge commotion by rolling on one another. Despite sitting at a safe distance from the arena where animals are battling, the King can still feel the ‘bloody froth’ that is ‘whisking through the air.” He believes that he and those around him are better off ‘here than there,” i.e., they are better off in the arena than in the sandpit below where the lions are fighting. This shows the King believes that he is superior to the lions—the king of the jungle.

Stanza 3

Count de Lorge’s beloved finds the King’s wit to be exceptionally amusing. She looks at the King and appears to be amazed by the King’s royal demeanour and power.

This makes her think of her lover, Count de Lorge. She feels he is ‘brave as brave can be’ and decides to throw her glove into the lions’ den. She believes that he will jump into the arena and grab it for her. This would prove his love for her and ‘great glory’ would be hers, as a result.

Stanza 4

She drops her glove and smiles. The Count understands what she wants. He follows her non-verbal instructions. He bows and smiles at her before leaping ‘into the lions wild.” The lions cannot touch him as he acts very quickly. Before anyone can react, he comes back and takes his place once again. So far, everything has gone according to her plan. However Count de Lorge finds this act of hers offensive. Instead of showing his love for her, he throws the glove at her face, stands up and -exits the arena.

King Francis, surprised, utters, ‘rightly done!’ He understands that she has done so to grab everybody’s attention and indulge her vanity’ than as a genuine attempt to have the Count’s love for her acknowledged. In his opinion, love’ would not set for her beloved ‘a task like that.’

Workbook MCQs :

1. Which of the following has been described in the poem as ‘a royal sport?
(a) Fight between tigers
(b) Fight between lions
(c) Fight between nobles
(d) Fight between the king and his nobles

Answer :- (b) Fight between lions

2. Who is the ‘one for whom’ he’ sighed?
(a) Count de Lorge
(b) King Francis
(c) Count de Lorge’s beloved
(d) The Queen

Answer :- (c) Count de Lorge’s beloved

3. Why was it ‘a gallant thing to see that crowning show?
(a) It required courage to see such a ferocious act
(b) There was love, valour and royalty in the scene
(c) It was the most brutal fight ever fought
(d) It was being held for the first time in the King’s court.

Answer :- (b) There was love, valour and royalty in the scene

4. What was the attitude of the King and his nobles towards the ‘royal beasts
(a) Apathy
(b) Empathy
(c) Disgust
(d) Fearful

Answer :- (a) Apathy

5. Select the poetic device used in the phrase—horrid laughing jaws.”
(a) Paradox
(b) Simile
(c) Metaphor
(d) Metonymy

Answer :- (a) Paradox

6. Which of the following is suggested by the line given below?
“They bit, they glared, gave blows like beams, a wind went with their paws.’
(a) The windy day
(b) The speed of the movement of the beasts
(c) The way the beasts looked at the audience
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- (b) The speed of the movement of the beasts

7. Why did King Francis say that ‘we’re better here than there’?
(a) They were at a safe distance from the ferocious fight in the pit
(b) They were enjoying the game rather than fighting out.
(c) They did not have to enter the arena to pick up the lady’s glove
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- (a) They were at a safe distance from the ferocious fight in the pit

8. The lady in the poem has compared her lover’s bravery with whom among the following?
(a) King Francis
(b) The two lions
(c) The nobles in the court
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- (d) None of the above.

9. Why did the lady decide to drop her glove in the arena where two lions were fighting?
(a) To distract the lions
(b) To show her love for her beloved
(c) To seek attention of the audience and thereby attain glory
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

10. Which figure of speech is used in all the phrases given below?

Seemed the same; brave as brave; would do wondrous things; great glory will be mine.
(a) Simile
(b) Metaphor
(c) Paradox
(d) Alliteration

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

11. Why does the lady smile after dropping her glove in the arena?
(a) To show her love for de Lorge
(b) To suggest that de Lorge would do as she wants him to do.
(c) To grab King Francis’ attention
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

12. Why did de Lorge throw the glove ‘right in the lady’s face
(a) To show his love for her
(b) To prove his bravery
(c) To prove how significant she is
(d) To show his annoyance at her vanity

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

13. Which of the following lines contain the same literary device as the following line?
Ramped and roared the lions, with horrid laughing jaws.
(a) Last week in someone’s place we saw
A dozen eyeballs on the floor
(b) So be it when i shall grow old
Or let me die!
The Child is father of the Man.
(c) Tinkling, luminous, tender and clear,
Like her bridal laughter and bridal tear.
(d) And saw, within the moonlight in his room
Making it rich, and like a lily in bloom.

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

Workbook Questions :

Extract 1

King Francis was a hearty king, and loved a royal sport,
And one day as his lions fought, sat looking on the court;
The nobles filled the benches, and the ladies in their pride,
And ‘mongst them sat the Count de Lorge, with one for whom he sighed.
And truly ‘twas a gallant thing to see that crowning show,
Valour and love, and a king above, and the royal beasts below.

(i) Where was King Francis? Why was he there? Which characteristic traits of Francis are described in this stanza?

Answer :- King Francis was present at the court, watching a royal sport involving lions fighting. He was there because he loved such spectacles. This stanza describes King Francis as a hearty king who enjoys sports and entertainment.

(iI) Who all were present in the audience, besides King Francis? Who sighed and for whom? What is suggested by the phrase ‘the ladies in their pride’?

Answer :- Besides King Francis, the audience included nobles and ladies. The Count de Lorge sighed, presumably for someone he had feelings for. The phrase “the ladies in their pride” suggests that the women were sitting with dignity or self-assurance.

(iII) What is it’ referred to as ‘a gallant thing? Why is it so?

Answer :- “It” refers to the spectacle of the lions fighting in the court. It is described as a gallant thing because it combines elements of bravery, love, and royalty. The presence of the king, along with the display of courage and affection, makes it a grand event.

(iV) Explain in your own words the last line of the given extract.

Answer :- The last line suggests that the spectacle of the lions fighting symbolizes a hierarchy, with the king at the top and the powerful beasts below. It emphasizes the contrast between the royal figures and the wild animals, highlighting the grandeur of the scene.

(v) Explain briefly how is this poem a ballad.

Answer :- The poem “The Glove and the Lions” is a ballad because it tells a story in a rhythmic and narrative form. It has a regular meter and rhyme scheme, contributing to its musical quality. Additionally, it contains elements of love, bravery, and dramatic tension, which are typical themes found in ballads.

Extract 2

Ramped and roared the lions, with horrid laughing jaws;
They bit, they glared, gave blows like beams, a wind went with their paws;
With wallowing might and stifled roar they rolled on one another;
Till all the pit with sand and mane was in a thunderous smother;
The bloody foam above the bars came whisking through the air;
Said Francis then, “Faith, gentlemen, we’re better here than there.”

(i) Where were the lions? Who all were watching them? Explain briefly the lions’ fight as described in the first line of the extract.

Answer :- The lions were in the pit, fighting against each other. King Francis and the audience, including nobles and ladies, were watching the spectacle. The lions’ fight, as described in the first line, depicts them roaring loudly and aggressively, with their jaws open in a frightening manner.

(iI) How can you say that the fight between the two lions was quite ferocious and brutal?

Answer :- The fight between the lions is portrayed as ferocious and brutal through vivid imagery and intense action described in the lines. They ramped and roared with horrid laughing jaws, bit each other, gave blows like beams, and rolled on one another with wallowing might. The description evokes a sense of violence and aggression, indicating a fierce battle between the animals.

(iII) Give two poetic devices used in this extract with one example of each.

Answer :- Poetic devices used in this extract:

  • Alliteration: “Ramped and roared the lions” (repetition of the ‘r’ sound)
  • Simile: “gave blows like beams” (comparison of the force of the lions’ blows to beams)

(iV) What did King Francis tell the audience? What is revealed about the king by his remark?

Answer :- King Francis tells the audience, “Faith, gentlemen, we’re better here than there.” This remark suggests that King Francis and the audience feel safer and more comfortable watching the lions’ fight from a distance rather than being directly involved or in close proximity to the dangerous animals. It reveals the king’s pragmatic nature and concern for the safety of himself and others.

(v) Explain briefly the imagery used in this extract.

Answer :- The imagery in this extract vividly depicts the intensity and brutality of the lions’ fight. It conjures images of the lions ramping and roaring with horrid jaws, giving blows like beams, and rolling on each other with wallowing might. The description of sand and mane in a thunderous smother and bloody foam whisking through the air creates a vivid picture of the chaotic and violent scene in the pit.

Extract 3

De Lorge’s love o’erheard the King, a beauteous lively dame
With smiling lips and sharp bright eyes, which always seemed the same;
She thought, the Count my lover is brave as brave can be;
He surely would do wondrous things to show his love of me;
King, ladies, lovers, all look on; the occasion is divine;
I’ll drop my glove, to prove his love; great glory will be mine.

(i) What did de Lorge’s lover overhear the King say? What did she think about the King?

Answer :- De Lorge’s lover overheard the King comment on her lover’s bravery, suggesting that he would do wondrous things to show his love. She thought highly of the King, as indicated by her perception of him as a beauteous lively dame with smiling lips and sharp bright eyes, which always seemed the same.

(iI) How has the speaker described de Lorge’s beloved? Why has she been described as ‘always seemed the same”

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iII) What did she think about de Lorge? What was she sure about?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iV) Which idea struck her? What was her real intention in implementing her idea?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(v) Explain briefly the characteristic traits of de Lorge’s lover as revealed in this extract?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

Extract 4

She dropped her glove, to prove his love, then looked at him and smiled;
He bowed, and in a moment leaped among the lions wild:
The leap was quick, return was quick, he has regained his place,
Then threw the glove, but not with love, right in the lady’s face.
“By God!” said Francis, “rightly done!” and he rose from where he sat:
“No love,” quoth he, “but vanity, sets love a task like that.”

(i) Who is ‘She’ referred to in this extract? Where did she drop her glove? Why did she do so?

Answer :- ‘She’ refers to de Lorge’s lover. She dropped her glove into the pit where the lions were fighting to test her lover’s love and bravery.

(iI) Why did she look at him and smiled? What does it reveal about her?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iII) How did de Lorge react to her smile? What forced him to do so?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iV) How did de Lorge come back from the pit unharmed? How did he react after coming back? How did King Francis react to it?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(v) Explain briefly the theme of the poem.

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )