The Power Of Music Workbook Solution : ICSE Treasure Chest

The Power Of Music Workbook Solution : ICSE Treasure Chest

Welcome to “The Power of Music Workbook Solution: ICSE Treasure Chest,” where we embark on a journey through the captivating narrative of ICSE English Literature Treasure Chest Part 2. Within these pages, we meticulously unravel the essence of “The Power of Music” through comprehensive workbook solutions. This post offers comprehensive answers to multiple-choice and contextual questions, deepening your understanding of the timeless tale. Meet the characters and delve into the nuances of character development and thematic exploration. Each question serves as a gateway to dissecting the text, urging readers to analyze subtle nuances and extract deeper meanings. Contextual inquiries broaden our canvas for exploration, encouraging critical engagement with socio-cultural backdrops and universal themes. Through this examination, readers sharpen analytical skills and develop a profound appreciation for literary craftsmanship. Whether a student navigating ICSE English Literature or an avid reader unraveling beloved stories, “The Power of Music Workbook Solutions” promises valuable companionship. Join us on this literary journey as we illuminate the path to understanding, one workbook solution at a time.

Table of Contents

Poem Summary :

The Poem in Detail

Lines 1 to 8

The poet describes how every summer, he, along with other people around him, have to endure the loud and discordant singing of Bhisma Lochan Sharma. He says that Bhisma sings so loudly and harshly that his voice echoes on the hills and in the plains all the way from Delhi to Burma (Myanmar). He keeps on singing as if he has staked his life on it and is hell-bent on it, whatever may happen. The people get confused by his continuous cacophony but they know he does not have bad intentions. Sometimes people, on hearing his harsh singing, run in panic and get trampled, whereas some others become pale and sick. Some old people plead with him that they have grown old and cannot take his singing anymore,
so he should stop singing immediately. Even the animals have to suffer due to Bhisma Lochan’s continuous, irritable singing. The bullock-carts are overturned and horses refuse to move and stand along the road. But unfazed by everything going on around him, Bhisma Lochan continues with his harsh singing. The whole ‘situation here seems to be exaggerated to get the effect of slapstick comedy.

Lines 9 to 16

The poet continues to describe the effect of Bhisma Lochan’s singing on animals, plants, and even the birds in the sky. He says that the animals are pitiful, i.e, the horses cry out in pain, stare and raise their feet in the air and look quite upset, the moment they hear Bhisma Lochan’s singing. Even the fishes, troubled by Bhisma Lochan’s singing dive deep down from the surface of the lake in search of silence. And the trees collapse with the sound that can be heard a mile away. His harsh, loud sound reaches the sky and on hearing that the birds lose control over their wings and turn upside down. Again the human beings request the eccentric Bhisma Lochan to stop singing for if he does not do so, they feel they would die. But Bhisma’s voice continues to soar higher and higher despite continuous pleading by the people. Even the sky weeps and the mighty buildings collapse due to the loud, unpleasant singing of Bhisma Lochan.

Lines 17 to 20

The poet says that now a change happens as a wise goat appears on the scene Bending its head he attacks the singer with its horns and its loud noise (bellowing equals the singer’s. That puts to an end Bhisma Lochan’s musical spree and give the world the ‘golden gift of silence.’

Workbook MCQs :

1. You catch his strain on hill and plain…’ What is referred to as ‘his strain”?
(a) The people like Bhisma
(b) The singers like Bhisma
(c) Bhisma Lochan’s singing
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- (c) Bhisma Lochan’s singing

2. What is the genre of the poem, The Power of Music’?
(a) Ballad
(b) Sonnet
(c) Elegy
(d) Nonsense Verse

Answer :- (d) Nonsense Verse

3. What kind of person was Bhisma Lochan Sharma?
(a) Determined
(b) Stubborn
(c) Gentle
(d) All of the above

Answer :- (b) Stubborn

4. Which of the following did NOT happen when people heard Bhisma Lochan singing?
(a) They got trampled
(b) They became pale and sick
(c) They were able to make him stop singing
(d) They got confused.

Answer :- (c) They were able to make him stop singing

5. Which figure of speech is used in the line given below?
‘The bullock-carts are overturned, and horses line the roadside.”
(a) Alliteration
(b) Simile
(c) Assonance
(d) Hyperbole

Answer :- (d) Hyperbole

6. Who are referred to as the ‘wretched brutes”?
(a) The horses
(b) The fishes
(c) The bulls
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- (a) The horses

7. What happens to the wretched brutes on hearing Bhisma Lochan’s singing?
(a) They raise their feet in air
(b) They cry out in pain
(c) They wonder what is happening
(d) All of the above.

Answer :- (d) All of the above

8. What happens to birds on hearing Bhisma Lochan’s loud singing?
(a) They lose control over their wings
(b) They start chirping loudly
(c) They stop flying forever
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- (a) They lose control over their wings

9. The billy goat has been compared to which of the following?
(a) A trained musician
(b) Bhisma Lochan
(c) A wise man
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

10. Which of the following grants the golden gift of silence to the world?
(a) The wise man
(b) The goat
(c) Bhisma Lochan
(d) None of the above.

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

11. Which of the following lines contains the same literary device as the one in
Sukumar Ray’s, “The welkin weeps to hear his screech…”?
(a) I learnt upon a coppice gate
When Frost was spectre-grey.
(b) …..life is too much like a pathless wood
Where our face burns and tickles with cobwebs.
(c) We circle well-worn grooves of water on a single note.
(d) To know I’m farther off from heaven
than when I was a boy!

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

Workbook Questions :

Extract 1

When summer comes, we hear the hums
Bhisma Lochan Sharma.
You catch his strain on hill and plain from Delhi
down to Burma
He sings as though he’s staked his life, he sings
as though he’s hell-bent;
The people, dazed, retire amazed although they
know it’s well-meant.

(i) Who is Bhisma Lochan Sharma? How is his singing?

Answer :- Bhisma Lochan Sharma, the subject of the poem, is portrayed as a singer whose vocal prowess is unmatched. His singing is described as powerful and captivating, with the ability to enrapture audiences far and wide.

(iI) Why does the speaker say that ‘his strain’ can be heard ‘on hill and plain fro Delhi down to Burma?

Answer :- The speaker emphasizes the widespread impact of Bhisma Lochan’s singing by stating that his strain can be heard not only in local surroundings but also across vast distances, from Delhi down to Burma. This geographical scope highlights the universality and reach of his musical influence.

(iII) What does the speaker say about Bhisma Lochan’s continuous singing?

Answer :- The speaker vividly describes Bhisma Lochan’s singing style, portraying him as someone who sings with immense passion and determination. He sings as though his life depends on it, exhibiting a relentless and unwavering commitment to his craft.

(iV) Although the people get confused on hearing Bhisma Lochan’s singing, what d they think about him? What does it suggest about him?

Answer :- Despite the confusion and bewilderment that Bhisma Lochan’s singing may cause among listeners, the speaker suggests that people ultimately admire and respect him for his talent and dedication. They may be taken aback or stunned by his singing, but they recognize the sincerity and passion behind it.

(v) Explain briefly the genre of this poem. State the figure of speech used to attai the characteristics of this genre?

Answer :- The poem belongs to the genre of satire or humor, employing exaggeration and absurdity to mock the exaggerated effects of Bhisma Lochan’s singing. The figure of speech used to achieve this comedic effect could be hyperbole, as the impact of Bhisma Lochan’s singing is exaggerated to comical proportions. Through humor and satire, the poem offers a lighthearted commentary on the power and influence of music.

Extract 2

They’re trampled in the panic rout or languish
pale and sickly,
And plead, ‘My friend, we’re near our end, oh
stop your singing quickly!”
The bullock-carts are overturned, and horses
line the roadside;

(i) Who are They’ referred to in the first line of the extract? What happens to them?

Answer :-  The “They” referred to in the first line of the extract are the people who are caught in the chaos and confusion caused by Bhisma Lochan’s singing. They experience various consequences such as being trampled in panic or becoming pale and sickly.

(iI) To whom do they plead and why?

Answer :- They plead to Bhisma Lochan himself, asking him to stop his singing quickly. Their pleading is likely out of desperation to alleviate the discomfort and chaos caused by his singing.

(iII) What is the effect of their pleading? What does it suggest about the man whom they plead for?

Answer :- The pleading of the people suggests that they are genuinely distressed and suffering due to the effects of Bhisma Lochan’s singing. It implies that despite recognizing his good intentions, they are unable to bear the overwhelming consequences of his powerful voice.

(iV) What is the effect of his singing on animals and birds?

Answer :- Bhisma Lochan’s singing has a disruptive effect on animals and birds as well. Bullock-carts are overturned, and horses line the roadside, indicating the disturbance caused to the animals by his singing. This suggests that his singing has a far-reaching impact beyond just human listeners.

(v) Which poetic device is used by the poet in this extract? Why? Does he achieve his objective? Give reasons to support your answer.

Answer :- The poet employs hyperbole in this extract to exaggerate the chaotic consequences of Bhisma Lochan’s singing. By portraying extreme scenarios such as trampling in panic and overturning of bullock-carts, the poet emphasizes the exaggerated effects of his singing for humorous effect. The objective of the poet is to highlight the absurdity of the situation and elicit laughter from the readers. This objective is achieved as the exaggerated descriptions add to the comedic tone of the poem, making it an effective satire on the power of music.

Extract 3

But Bhisma Lochan, unconcerned, goes
booming out his broadside.
The wretched brutes resent the blare the hour
they hear it sounded,
They whine and stare with feet in air or wonder
quite confounded.
The fishes dived below the lake in frantic search
for silence,
The very trees collapse and shake – you hear the
crash a mile hence –
And in the sky the feathered fly turn turtle while
they’re winging,

(i) What was Bhisma Lochan unconcerned about? What is meant by—he ‘goes booming out his broadside?

Answer :- Bhisma Lochan was unconcerned about the chaos and disruption caused by his singing. “He goes booming out his broadside” means that he continues to sing loudly and vigorously without any regard for the distress it causes to others.

(iI) Who were the ‘wretched brutes’ Why did they behave abnormally?

Answer :- The “wretched brutes” refer to the animals who are affected by Bhisma Lochan’s singing. They behave abnormally by resenting the loud noise, whining, staring with their feet in the air, or becoming confounded with wonder.

(iII) State the three activities done by the wretched brutes on hearing Bhisma Lochan’s singing?

Answer :- The three activities done by the wretched brutes on hearing Bhisma Lochan’s singing are:

a) They resent the blare and whine.

b) They stare with their feet in the air or wonder quite confounded.

c) The fishes dived below the lake in frantic search for silence.

(iV) How are the fishes and the trees affected by Bhisma Lochan’s singing?

Answer :- The fishes are affected by diving below the lake in a frantic search for silence, indicating their discomfort and desire to escape the noise. The trees collapse and shake, with the crash being heard a mile away, demonstrating the physical impact of the sound waves generated by Bhisma Lochan’s singing.

(v) What happens to the birds in the sky? Do you agree with the speaker of the poem? Give reasons to support your answer.

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

Extract 4

The welkin weeps to hear his screech, and mighty
mansions tumble.
But now there comes a billy goat, a most
sagacious fellow,
He downs his horns and charges straight, with
bellow answ’ring bellow.
The strains of song are tossed and whirled by
blast of brutal violence,
And Bhisma Lochan grants the world the golden
gift of silence.

(i) Who ‘weeps’ in this extract and why? Which figure of speech is used in the ‘welkin weeps’?

Answer :- The “welkin” weeps in this extract, which is a poetic way of saying that the sky or heavens cry. It weeps because of the distress caused by Bhisma Lochan’s screeching singing. The figure of speech used here is personification, where the sky is attributed with human emotions.

(iI) What happens to ‘mighty mansions’? Which natural object met the same fate as mansions, in the earlier in the poem?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iII) Why is the billy goat described as ‘a most sagacious fellow’?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(iV) What does the billy goat do which many others could not? How?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )

(v) Which figure of speech is used in the last line of the extract? What is the significance of this line? Give reason to support your answer.

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View )