Tithonus Workbook Solution : ISC Rhapsody & Prism

Tithonus Workbook Solutions : ISC Rhapsody & Prism

Welcome to “Tithonus Workbook Solution: ISC Rhapsody & Prism,” where we explore ISC English Literature Rhapsody & Prism’s captivating narrative. Within these pages, we unravel the essence of “Tithonus” through meticulous workbook solutions. This post offers comprehensive answers to multiple-choice and contextual questions, deepening your understanding of the timeless tale. Meet Tithonus, the tragic protagonist, and delve into the nuances of character development and thematic exploration. Each question serves as a gateway to dissecting the text, urging readers to analyze subtle nuances and extract deeper meanings. Contextual inquiries broaden our canvas for exploration, encouraging critical engagement with socio-cultural backdrops and universal themes. Through this examination, readers sharpen analytical skills and develop a profound appreciation for literary craftsmanship. Whether a student navigating ISC English Literature or an avid reader unraveling beloved stories, “Tithonus Workbook Solutions” promises valuable companionship. Join us on this literary journey as we illuminate the path to understanding, one workbook solution at a time.

Table of Contents

Poem Summary :

The Poem in Detail

Lines 1 to 10

The poem begins with the speaker, Tithonus, bemoaning his immortality as he looks around the woods. He realises all things come to an end. The woods decay and fall i.e. the trees get old, decay and fall to the ground. The clouds dissolve into rain and disappear. Man fulfils his duties on the earth and then is buried under it. After having lived for many years, the swan dies. Tithonus alone is troubled by his immortality. His life is fading away, in the arms of Eos in the quiet eastern horizon i.e., the home of the Goddess Eos or Aurora. He calls himself “a white. hair’d shadow roaming like a dream” in the silent spaces of the East covered with layers of mist and the bright glory of the dawn. It means that he has grown frail and is wandering some where in the recesses of Eos’ palace.

Lines 11 to 31

Tithonus sadly recalls the days of his youth when he was truly a man “so glorious in his beauty”. The goddess Eos chose him because of his youth. Then he had thought of himself no less than a god. He had asked her to grant him immortality. She had granted him that gift with a smile. She had given it to him generously like wealthy men who do not bother about how they give gifts. But relentless time had done its work—it had beaten him down, deprived him of his strength and made him useless. Though Time could not end his life, it has maimed him to live in the company of Eos’ everlasting youth. He has an unending old age, and he lived in the company of Eos who has unending youth. All his beauty and glory are in ruins now. He asks Eos if her love can now make amends. He sees the tears of pity in her eyes and he asks her to take back her gift of immortality and to let him go. Following the universal pattern of existence that all should die is the best principle. It is wrong on the part of any man to desire an immortal life that is different from the one prescribed for the human race.

Lines 32 to 49

Some gentle breeze causes a break in the cloud through which Tithonus gets a glimpse of the earth, “dark world where he was born”. (At that time Tithonus was living in the sky with Eos.) Once more he sees Eos’ mysterious glimmer stealing from her pure brows and from her pure shoulders: he sees her bosom beating vigorously with a renewed heart; he sees her cheeks becoming more red in the darkness, and her sweet eyes brighten slowly near his own eyes. Before Eos’ eyes make the stars blind with her powerful light, her horses get ready to draw her chariot. They shake away the darkness from their loosened manes and make the twilight look like flakes of fire. That is, Tithonus sees her getting ready once more for her daily task of dissolving the darkness with her bright light. Tithonus says, “Look you are growing beautiful and you depart silently before you give an answer to my request”. She sheds tears of grief on his cheek for his miserable condition. Her tears create a fear in his mind, and he trembles lest the saying that he had heard long ago in the dark earth should be true, namely, that the gods cannot take back their gifts. If that saying be true, it would not be possible for Eos to take back from Tithonus the gift of immortality.

Lines 50 to 63

In a tone of lamentation, Tithonus recalls the days when he used to watch the bright outline forming around Eos and her dim curls brightening into sunny rings. He used to see the mystic change come over her. He used to feel his blood glow with her glow. He speaks of the warmth on his “Mouth, forehead, eyelids”: kisses which were gentler than the half-opened buds in April. He recalls the sweet vague words that she spoke while she kissed him, words which were as sweet as the song of Apollo while he built the towers of Troy.

Lines 64 to 76

Finally he asks her not to keep him with her forever. His nature can no longer harmonise with hers. His youth and the passion of his youth are now gone. Her pleasant shadows fall on him coldly. All her light has become dull to him. His old feet with wrinkles still remain cold when they receive her ever shining glimmer. Meanwhile he feels the warmth of the steam rising up from the fields around the happy men living on earth. He envies these men who have the privilege of dying. He envies still more those who are dead in their graves which are covered with grass. He appeals to Eos to release him from the sky and allow him to return to earth. If she grants his prayer, she who sees everything from above, could see him die and see his grave below. He, being made from the elements from the earth, would return to its soil and forget her empty domes. Meanwhile Eos would continue her daily journey every morning on her silvery chariot.

Workbook MCQs :

1. How do the vapours weep their burthen’?
(a) The clouds burst on the hills
(b) The vapours dissolve in the
(c) The clouds dissolve into rain
(d) None of the above.

Answers :- (c) The clouds dissolve into rain 

2. Who is consuming ‘Me’ in the first stanza of the poem?
(a) Pride
(b) Immortality
(c) Mortality
(d) Beauty.

Answers :- (b) Immortality

3. In whose arms in the speaker withering?
(a) His beloved’s
(b) His own
(c) Death
(d) None of the above.

Answers :- (a) His beloved’s 

4. What is referred to by the ‘quiet limit of the world?
(a) The eastern horizon
(b) The home of Goddess, Eos
(c) The end of human life
(d) Both (a) and (b).

Answers :- (d) Both (a) and (b).

5. What is the tone of the poem, Tithonus™?
(a) Epigrammatic
(b) Elegiac
(c) Epistolary
(d) None of the above.

Answers :- (b) Elegiac

6. Which type of poetry is used in the poem, Tithonus™
(a) Sonnet
(b) Ode
(c) Ballad
(d) Dramatic Monologue.

Answers :- (d) Dramatic Monologue.

7. Who is the one in the poem, who lies beneath’?
(a) Cockroach
(b) Dead man
(c) Grasshopper
(d) All of the above.

Answers :- (b) Dead man

8. What is suggested by ‘A white-haird shadow roaming like a dream
(a) An insignificant dream
(b) Moon light
(c) Man’s shadow
(d) None of the above.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

9. What does the poet bemoan as he looks at earth?
(a) The suffering of man
(b) The death of all things
(c) His immortality
(d) None of the above.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

10. Where is he now, who is described as ‘once a man’
(a) In the forest
(b) In the sky
(c) In the vapours
(d) In the sea.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

11. Who is described in line — ‘So glorious in his beauty’?
(a) God of Sky
(b) God of Dawn
(c) The Prince of Trojan
(d) The Prince of Rome.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

12. Who among the following has been compared with ‘wealthy men’ in the Poem?
(a) Tithonus
(b) Eos oem)
(c) Zeus
(d) None of the above.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

13. Who are referred to as ‘they’ in the line given below? And tho’ they could not end me, left me maim’d
(a) The Gods
(b) Time
(c) Nature
(d) None of the above.

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14. What ‘amends’ does the speaker ask Eos to make?
(a) To answer her questions
(b) Not to weep at his condition
(c) To take back her gift of immortality
(d) To gift her immortal youth.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

15. Where does the speaker want to go?
(a) To his home
(b) To a place where all are immorty
(c) To Earth
(d) To heaven.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

16. Which figure of speech is used in the line given below? ‘Whispering I knew not what of wild and sweet’
(a) Allusion
(b) Alliteration
(c) Metaphor
(d) Simile.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

17. In the line—Thy presence and thy portals’, who is referred by Thy”?
(a) The goddess of dawn
(b) Tithonus
(c) God Apollo
(d) None of the above.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

18. What is referred to by the speaker as the ‘dark world’?
(a) Heaven
(b) Underground
(c) The earth
(d) None of the above.

Answers :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

Related Posts

Complete The Sentences :

1. In the poem, Tithonus, the speaker says that ‘Me only cruel immortality/consumes’ because he is the only one who is condemned to eternal immortality and to eternal old age and weak and shadowy existence. Like other living things he cannot shake off his worn out physical self and die.

2. In the poem, Tithonus, the speaker has defined his immortality as cruel because he does not have eternal youth and is broken and decreipt with age and his immortality has turned him into a mere shadow of his self, without his former youth and beauty.

3. In the poem, Tithonus, the speaker says that he was ‘once a man’ because before he got the gift of immortality, he was a young, handsome man and now with the passage of time, he had lost his youth and had become a mere shadow of his former self.

4. In the poem, Tithonus, the speaker says that Eos chose him as her beloved because of his beauty and youth.

5. In the poem, Tithonus, the speaker asks Eos to take back her gift of immortality because without the gift of eternal youth he cannot endure the suffering he has because of the gift of immortality due to which he has become old and decreipt.

6. In the poem, Tithonus, the speaker wants to go back to Earth because For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

7. In the poem, Tithonus, the speaker says that men should not pass beyond the ‘goal of ordinance’ because For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

8. Tithonus implores Eos to let him go because For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

9. Tithonus says, ‘And all I was in, ashes’ because For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

10. Tithonus says that it is not proper for a human being to go against the laws of nature because For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

11. Eos has tears in her eyes when she sees the miserable condition of Tithonus because For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

12. Tithonus envies people who live on the earth because For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

13. Tithonus could not go back to earth as for his wish because For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

14. Tithonus towards the end of the poem laments that his nature can no longer mix with that of Eos because For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

Short Question Answers :

1. What does the speaker want to suggest by giving the examples of ‘the woods’ and ‘the vapours’? Why?

Answer :- In the poem “Tithonus” by Alfred Lord Tennyson, the speaker mentions ‘the woods’ and ‘the vapours’ to illustrate the natural cycle of life and death, which he envies. The woods symbolize the organic, natural life cycle, where things grow, thrive, and eventually die. The vapours represent the ephemeral nature of life, which rises, exists briefly, and then dissipates. By contrasting his eternal, unchanging existence with these natural processes, Tithonus highlights the curse of his immortality. He suggests that mortality, with its natural end, is preferable to his unending, weary existence.

2. Who is being consumed in the poem by ‘cruel immortality’? Explain how is he being consumed?

Answer :- In “Tithonus,” the speaker himself, Tithonus, is being consumed by ‘cruel immortality’. He was granted eternal life by the goddess Eos, but not eternal youth. As a result, he ages endlessly, growing ever more decrepit and frail, but never dying. This immortality has become a torment as he endures the endless passage of time, decaying and withering away without the release of death. Tithonus feels trapped in a perpetual state of suffering, as his body continues to age and deteriorate without the possibility of dying.

3. Who has been described in the poem as ‘white-hair’d shadow roaming like a dream’? Why?

Answer :- Tithonus describes himself as the ‘white-hair’d shadow roaming like a dream’. This description emphasizes his aged, ghostly appearance and his insubstantial, almost spectral existence. As an immortal who continues to age, Tithonus becomes a shadow of his former self, no longer vibrant or alive in the way mortals are. He roams the world like a dream, detached from the reality and vibrancy of life, highlighting the curse of his immortality and the isolation it brings.

4. Who was ‘once a man’? What has happened to him now?

Answer :- Tithonus, who was ‘once a man,’ is now an immortal being suffering from endless aging. Originally a mortal, Tithonus was granted immortality by Eos, the goddess of the dawn. However, he was not given eternal youth, so while he cannot die, he continues to age indefinitely. This endless aging process has turned him into a decrepit, ghost-like figure who envies the natural cycle of life and death experienced by mortals.

5. By whom was the speaker in the poem ‘chosen’ and why?

Answer :- In “Tithonus,” the speaker, Tithonus, was ‘chosen’ by Eos, the goddess of the dawn, because she loved him. Eos wanted to keep Tithonus with her forever, so she asked Zeus to grant him immortality. However, she neglected to ask for eternal youth along with immortality. As a result, Tithonus was condemned to an endless existence of aging and decay. Eos’s choice, driven by her desire to be with him eternally, unintentionally became a source of great suffering for Tithonus.

6. Whom does the speaker ask to give him immortality’ Why does he ask for it? How does he describe the giver of immortality after he gets it?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

7. What is referred to by the sentence— ‘But thy strong Hours indignant workd their wills’ What is the effect of its work on the speaker? 

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

8. Explain briefly the discomfort suffered by Tithonus because of Immortal age beside immortal youth’?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

9. Whom does the speaker ask to ‘make amends’ What amends are to be made and why?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

10. What is referred to as the ‘dark world”? Why does the speaker want to return to this ‘dark world’? 

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

11. What’s referred to as the wild team which loves Eos? How does the team usher in the dawn? 

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

12. Why does not Eos grant the request of Tithonus? Why do her tears make her lover tremble? 

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

13. Why does the speaker think that the men on earth are happy? In which condition is he in comparison to men on earth?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

14. Why does Tithonus want to go back to earth? What would Eos do when Tithonus would be on earth? 

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

15. Explain the meaning of:

1 earth in earth forget these empty courts, 

And thee returning on thy silver wheels. 

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

Long Question Answers :

1. Tithonus is a parable showing the discomfort that follows when blooming youth exists together with the extreme old age. Briefly state how the poet shows that blooming youth cannot exist together with extreme old age.

Answer :- In “Tithonus,” Alfred Lord Tennyson illustrates the stark contrast between eternal youth and extreme old age through the relationship between Tithonus and Eos, the goddess of dawn. Eos remains perpetually young and beautiful, symbolizing blooming youth. Tithonus, on the other hand, is granted immortality without eternal youth, causing him to age endlessly. Tennyson describes Tithonus as a “white-hair’d shadow,” emphasizing his frailty and decay, while Eos’s youthful energy remains constant. This juxtaposition highlights the unnatural and painful coexistence of youth and decrepitude. Tithonus’s observations of the natural world further underscore this theme. He envies the cycle of life and death experienced by the woods and vapours, where growth and decay are balanced, suggesting that youth and age naturally follow one another. The poem conveys the discomfort and dissonance through Tithonus’s longing for death as a release from his unending aging, showing that eternal youth and extreme old age are incompatible. Tithonus’s lamentation and the stark imagery of his aged condition against Eos’s eternal dawn emphasize the futility and suffering that arise from their unnatural coexistence.

2. Describe briefly the happiness, suffering, and frustration of Tithonus.

Answer :- Tithonus’s happiness is rooted in his love for Eos, the goddess of dawn, and the initial joy of being chosen by her. His love for Eos and the promise of eternal life brought him immense joy initially. However, this happiness is short-lived as he soon realizes the consequences of his immortality. His suffering begins as he continues to age while Eos remains eternally youthful. Tithonus endures the endless decay of his body, becoming a “white-hair’d shadow” and experiencing the physical and emotional toll of perpetual aging. The realization that he will never again experience the vitality of youth, nor the peace of death, leads to profound frustration. He is trapped in a body that withers away but cannot die, creating a torturous existence. Tithonus’s frustration is further exacerbated by his awareness of the natural cycle of life and death that he has been excluded from. He envies the mortal men who experience the completeness of life, aging, and death, and longs to join them in the “dark world” of mortality. His repeated pleas to Eos to let him die highlight his desperation and the deep regret he feels for having sought immortality. This complex interplay of initial happiness, prolonged suffering, and intense frustration captures the tragic essence of Tithonus’s fate.

3. How does the poet carry out the theme of the futility of the desire for immortality?

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

4. Tithonus is a dramatic monologue. Explain the characteristic elements of a monologue in the poem. Also describe the elements of the poem which do not conform to the usual style of a dramatic monologue.

Answer :- For Full Answers Get The Workbook Answers PDF – View ]

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